The Wilson River

The Wilson River

Know Your Forest: The Wilson River flows 33 miles thru the Tillamook State Forest all the way to the Tillamook Bay. Deep pools and rocky shores, perfect for your summer swim or the incredible populations of Chinook, Chum, and Steelhead. Mark this on your maps and come play in the forest. 

Cycle Oregon's 2018 Gravel Ride in the Tillamook State Forest

Cycle Oregon's 2018 Gravel Ride in the Tillamook State Forest

Come adventure in the Tillamook Forest! We've partnered with Cycle Oregon to bring you their inaugural Gravel Ride - October 5th-7th. The route will explore the areas surrounding the future Salmonberry Trail and we'll be hosting site tours throughout the weekend for curious riders. With funds raised at these incredible rides @cycleoregon supports communities all across Oregon. These Community and Signature Grants - like the one awarded to @thesalmonberrytrail - can turn dreams into reality. Come Ride!

Trees to Sea Scenic Byway

Trees to Sea Scenic Byway

Running nearby the future Salmonberry Trail is Highway 6 which was just officially designated as Oregon's Trees to Sea Scenic Byway! Jack Mulder of Tillamook Creamery, and board member of the Tillamook Forest Heritage Trust, framed this historical recognition aptly: "If we went back in time and told those who faced the ashes of the Tillamook Burn that Hwy 6 would someday be the Trees to Sea Scenic Byway, do you think they would believe us?" A good reminder of the what the combined power of time, dedicated communities, and the forest can do.    

PHOTO CREDIT: Neil Sy Photo

Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency signs Salmonberry Trail Rail Line Use Agreement with Port of Tillamook Bay.

Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency signs Salmonberry Trail Rail Line Use Agreement with Port of Tillamook Bay.

What began ten years ago as a grand vision connecting the Oregon Coast to the Valley, crossed a milestone on April 6th, 2018 when the Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) agreed in a unanimous vote to sign the lease agreement with the Port of Tillamook Bay, moving the project into its next phase for planning and development.

Making Sense of the 16 Miles of Chaos

Making Sense of the 16 Miles of Chaos

Scope of work being prepared for complicated planning job in the Salmonberry Canyon

Maybe you’ve heard the middle section of the Salmonberry Trail referred to as the “16 miles of chaos.” That’s a pretty good description, given how much damage that stretch experienced from the 2007 super storm.

The 2007 Great Coastal Gale damaged or destroyed bridges, tunnels and miles of railroad grade in this stretch. Figuring out how and where to get a trail through this remote stretch near the top of the Coast Range is going to take some careful and serious planning and engineering. 

Salmonberry Trail Partnership Raises $2-plus million so far

Salmonberry Trail Partnership Raises $2-plus million so far

Even though we’re still several years away from major trail construction, there’s plenty of work to do to get ready: trail segment planning, engineering assessments, public involvement, permitting, and what feels like a million other things to think about and prepare for. We’ve been busy collectively raising capacity funds to assist with this work, and we need your help.

Trail Blazers: Stevie Stephens Burden, Mayor of Wheeler, Oregon

Trail Blazers: Stevie Stephens Burden, Mayor of Wheeler, Oregon

This segment is an opportunity to bring a face to the conversation of this trail. It’s the heroes, the hikers, and the locals that bring life to the project that can feel intangible to the outside reader. This section can provide future hope from different perspectives, creating solidarity and practicing patience while the trail is under construction. The stories are aimed to inspire participation, conversation, and maybe even self-reflection.   * Who / Where / Perspective / Call to Action

The Salmonberry Trail was a focus of conversation last week on set at the Tualatin Valley Community Television studios.

The Salmonberry Trail was a focus of conversation last week on set at the Tualatin Valley Community Television studios.

The Salmonberry Trail was a focus of conversation last week on set at the Tualatin Valley Community Television studios. In this clip, "Cyclogy Today" TV host and Northwest Bicycle Safety Council president , Ann Morrow, interviews Doug Decker about the history of the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway and the future of the proposed Salmonberry Trail. Decker discusses his role as development director plus the challenges and opportunities the project brings. 

A Win for Tillamook County

A Win for Tillamook County

Jack Mulder, talks about The Salmonberry Trail planning and contstruction work being completed in Tillamook County along the Coastal Segment of the Salmonberry Trail and the Port of Tillamook Bay Railroad. Mulder is a Commissioner with the Port of Tillamook Bay and the Port’s representative to the Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) 

Jack was filmed on Hoquarten Slough in downtown Tillamook and you can hear construction noise coming from a nearby $38.2-million transportation revitalization project. When this project finishes next year, Tillamook will have two new bridges, wider streets, pedestrian paths, and the first segment of the ambitious Salmonberry Trail.

Thanks Donors! Salmonberry Trail needs your help

Thanks Donors! Salmonberry Trail needs your help

Even though we’re still several years away from major trail construction, there’s plenty of work to do to get ready: trail segment planning, engineering assessments, hazardous material surveys, public involvement, marketing plans, economic and health benefit studies, permitting, and what feels like a million other things to think about and prepare for.

Salmonberry Trail in the News

Salmonberry Trail in the News

Portland television stations have been taking note of the proposed Salmonberry Trail this summer. Check out these two stories, the first by Kaitlyn Bolduc at KPTV Channel 12 shot in June 2017, and the second by Chris Liedle at KATU Channel 2 broadcast in August. We appreciated that in both cases, the reporters reminded viewers that the trail doesn’t exist yet and that entry into the area is dangerous and prohibited.

Environmental Clean-up Assessment And Inventory Nearing Completion

Environmental Clean-up Assessment And Inventory Nearing Completion

Three years of inventory and analysis are coming to a close for the environmental/planning contractor hired by Tillamook County examining possible hazardous material sites along 62 miles of the Port of Tillamook Bay (POTB) railroad that could eventually become part of the proposed Salmonberry Trail. The assessment work, funded by a three-year Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “brownfields” grant, has involved a comprehensive corridor study, site inventory and ranking for approximately 30 individual sites, and four on-site investigations involving soil and groundwater testing.